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Money

This Activities Program Engages and Calms People With Dementia

For people with dementia, having nothing to do can contribute to agitation, frustration and a feeling of loss of control and well-being. It is a situation family caregivers often encounter. Laura Gitlin, distinguished professor and dean of the College of Nursing and Health Professions at Drexel University in Philadelphia, has spent more than three decades…

The post This Activities Program Engages and Calms People With Dementia appeared first on Next Avenue.

Are You Ready for Daily Life With a Newly Retired Spouse?

Four years ago, I was excited about my husband’s imminent retirement. I envisioned him cleaning the basement, repainting the house and cooking dinner while I was at work. Now he’s retired, and I realize the odds are better that the whistling forest animals from Snow White  will drop by to maintain our home. There was no…

The post Are You Ready for Daily Life With a Newly Retired Spouse? appeared first on Next Avenue.

Using softness to add more Treasury exposure to Volatility Portfolio–maybe you should be adding Treasuries too

Treasury prices have been a little weak over the last two weeks. As a consequence the Vanguard Intermediate Term Treasury ETF (VGIT) and the Vanguard Short Term Treasury ETF (VGSH), for example, have dropped from highs on June 25 of $66.03 and $60.94, respectively, to $$65.56 and $60.75 at 3 .p.m New York time today. Not much of a slide but still an opportunity to add to or establish positions ahead of an interest rate cut by the Federal Reserve at its July 31 and September 18 meetings

In the longer short term does the market’s intense focus on interest rate cuts from the Fed set up a trap for stocks?

Looking at what I called "the shortish short term" in a post yesterday, I said that in that time frame the market is likely to behave as if nothing much matters besides the Federal Reserve and interest rate cuts. The logic, I argued, works like this: We're in the midst of a rally to historic highs premised on anticipated interest rate cuts from the Fed. As long as those promises are in the pipeline, what reason is there to sell? But what happens in the longer short term (what you might be tempted to call the medium term even though I'm looking just three months or so down the road) when the promises prove false--or more likely when the Fed keeps its promises and delivers 2 to 3 interest rate cuts of 50 to 75 basis points and thus empties the rate cut pipeline?

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